Democracy Now!

Immigration

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  • The White House is moving to greatly expand the Department of Homeland Security’s authority to deport millions of undocumented immigrants and to increase the number of immigration and Border Patrol agents by 15,000. Under rules issued on Tuesday, almost any undocumented person in the country could be detained and deported, even if they have never committed a crime. A traffic violation or mere suspicion of committing a crime could now be grounds for deportation. Any immigrant who cannot prove they have been in the United States for over two years could be deported without a hearing. Any migrant, regardless of their nationality, who crosses the southern border will be deported to Mexico while they await deportation hearings. The memos also call for the prosecution of parents who seek to reunite their family by using smugglers to bring their children into the country. We speak to University of Michigan Law School professor Margo Schlanger, who served as the head of civil rights and civil liberties at the Department of Homeland Security, and Cesar Vargas, co-director of DREAM Action Coalition. He is New York state’s first openly undocumented attorney.

  • The White House is moving to greatly expand the Department of Homeland Security’s authority to deport millions of undocumented immigrants and to increase the number of immigration and Border Patrol agents by 15,000. We look at how President Obama’s deportation practices set the stage for today’s new crackdown. During his time in office, Obama deported a record 2.7 million people. In 2014, the head of the National Council of La Raza, Janet Murguía, called Obama the nation’s "deporter-in-chief." We speak to former Department of Homeland Security attorney Margo Schlanger and attorney Cesar Vargas, co-director of DREAM Action Coalition.

  • Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly has drafted and signed sweeping new guidelines to speed up the mass deportation of undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States. The memos instruct federal agencies to begin hiring 10,000 more Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, as well as 5,000 more Border Patrol agents. They also detail plans to accelerate deportation hearings and to expand the number of people prioritized for removal from the United States. McClatchy is reporting hundreds of thousands more undocumented immigrants in the United States would be subject to what’s known as expedited removal proceedings to get them quickly out of the country. According to McClatchy, children who arrived in the United States as "unaccompanied minors" would no longer be protected against deportation, and their parents would be subject to criminal prosecution if they had paid human traffickers to bring their children across the border. For more, we speak with Franco Ordoñez, White House correspondent for the McClatchy Washington Bureau. His latest article is "DHS chief proposes prosecuting parents of children smuggled into U.S."

  • On Friday, a Seattle judge ruled not to release 23-year-old Daniel Ramirez Medina from the Northwest Detention Center at Tacoma, even though Ramirez, who was arrested by ICE agents more than a week ago, has permission to live and work in the United States under President Obama’s DACA program. Ramirez has been in the United States since he was seven years old. For more on his case, we speak with Tim Warden-Hertz, the directing attorney for the Tacoma office of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project. We also speak with Franco Ordoñez, White House correspondent for the McClatchy Washington Bureau. His latest article is "DHS chief proposes prosecuting parents of children smuggled into U.S."

  • McClatchy is reporting the harsh new draft orders signed by the Department of Homeland Security were largely endorsed by then-Sen. Jeff Sessions months before he took office as attorney general. We speak to McClatchy reporter Franco Ordoñez.

  • President Trump said he would "show great heart" when considering whether to deport recipients of DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. So why is Daniel Ramirez Medina sitting in jail? We look at the case of a 23-year-old father who was detained by ICE one week ago in Des Moines, Washington, even though he has permission to live and work in the United States under DACA. His supporters have maintained a vigil at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Washington, where he is being held. It’s a private detention center owned by the for-profit prison company GEO Group. We go to Seattle, Washington, to speak with Councilmember Lorena González, a civil rights attorney who is the city’s first Latino councilmember.

  • We go inside the First Unitarian church in Denver to interview Jeanette Vizguerra, an immigrant mother of four children who has taken refuge there out of fear she would be arrested and deported to Mexico if she went to her scheduled check-in with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Vizguerra came to the U.S. from Mexico in 1997 and is one of the founders of the Metro Denver Sanctuary Coalition. She previously won five postponements of deportation, but said she doubts she could win a similar reprieve under the Trump administration.

  • We go to Denver to speak with Reverend Mike Morran, senior minister at First Unitarian Society of Denver, where an immigrant mother of four has has taken sanctuary to avoid deportation. "We believe that we are not breaking any laws by having her in the church," Rev. Morran says. He describes how the church came to host Jeanette Vizguerra, and explains their protocol for how to respond to immigration agents if they come to arrest her.

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