Democracy Now!

Bernie Sanders

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  • As Donald Trump approaches his 100th day as president on Saturday, his approval ratings are the lowest any president has had at this stage in generations. A recent poll by NBC News and The Wall Street Journal found just 40 percent of Americans approve of his job performance so far. Trump took to Twitter to call the poll "totally wrong." This comes as former presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders has emerged as one the country’s most popular politicians. The Hill reports a Harvard-Harris poll shows 57 percent of registered voters view him favorably. Meanwhile, some former Sanders supporters have launched a movement to "Draft Bernie for a People’s Party," urging him to start a new progressive party and run for president again in 2020. We speak with Nick Brana, the former outreach coordinator for the Bernie Sanders campaign, and Cornel West, professor of the practice of public philosophy at Harvard University. His new piece in The Guardian is headlined "The Democrats delivered one thing in the past 100 days: disappointment."

  • On Friday, House Republicans failed to muster enough support to pass the GOP healthcare plan, which some call Trumpcare. In response, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has announced he will soon introduce a bill to create a single-payer healthcare system. Several progressive groups are backing a single-payer system, including the Working Families Party, the Progressive Campaign Change Committee, CREDO, Social Security Works and National Nurses United. For more, we speak with Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, co-founder of Physicians for a National Health Program. She is a professor at CUNY-Hunter College and a primary care physician. She is also a lecturer at Harvard Medical School.

  • Following President Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night, Vermont senator and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders responded forcefully to Trump’s speech. We air part of Sanders’ response last night and speak to his former advisor, economist Jeffrey Sachs.

  • On December 5, Democracy Now! hosted a historic conversation between Noam Chomsky and Harry Belafonte as part of our 20th anniversary celebration. It marked the first time they appeared on stage together in conversation. The two have been longtime champions of social justice. Chomsky is a world-renowned political dissident, linguist and author who gained fame in the 1960s for his critique of the Vietnam War and U.S. imperialism. He is institute professor emeritus at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught for more than 50 years. Harry Belafonte is a longtime civil rights activist who was an immensely popular singer and actor. He was one of Martin Luther King’s closest confidants and helped organize the March on Washington in 1963.

  • Three weeks after the election of Donald Trump, Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke at the Free Library of Philadelphia as part of his "Our Revolution" book tour. He spoke harshly about the corporate media. "What media does and what media loves is conflict and political gossip and polls and fundraising and all that stuff," Sanders said. "What media loves is to focus on the candidates. What the American people, I believe, want is for us to focus on them, not the candidates, not anymore."

  • In a Democracy Now! special, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders sat down with Amy Goodman at the Free Library of Philadelphia in late November in his most extensive broadcast interview since Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton just weeks earlier.

  • In the wake of Donald Trump’s election victory over Hillary Clinton, some progressives are now pushing a shake-up of the Democratic Party’s leadership in efforts to reform the party. But Cornel West says he doubts the Democratic Party can be reformed. During the Democratic primary, West endorsed Bernie Sanders. Sanders later picked him to serve on the Democratic platform committee. After Hillary Clinton won the nomination, West made headlines when he endorsed Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein. For more, we speak with West about the Democratic Party and what organizing looks like in the wake of the election.

  • By Amy Goodman & Denis Moynihan
    Rarely do you hear a news personality on television admitting that they failed miserably in covering the Bernie Sanders campaign. The U.S. media effectively iced out a major-party candidate who consistently held the largest rallies, even without a media megaphone.

  • Prior to his interview with Amy Goodman on Monday, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) gave a speech at the Free Library of Philadelphia talking about the election of Donald Trump, the Democratic Party, his new book "Our Revolution" and more.

  • In a Democracy Now! special, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders sat down with Amy Goodman at the Free Library of Philadelphia on Monday night in his most extensive broadcast interview since Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton two weeks ago. He began by speaking about Donald Trump’s election night victory and the need to rebuild the Democratic Party.

  • When Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders first launched his campaign, the mainstream media called him a fringe candidate and largely ignored his campaign. But during the Democratic primary, the independent, self-identified socialist shocked the nation by winning 22 states and about 45 percent of pledged delegates while challenging Hillary Clinton, who began her campaign with the support of the entire Democratic Party establishment. Many Sanders supporters now wonder if he would have been the stronger candidate to face Donald Trump in the general election. On Monday night, Bernie Sanders sat down with Amy Goodman for an interview in front of a live audience at the Free Library of Philadelphia and spoke about the corporate media, the Democratic primary and when he began to "feel the Bern."

  • In the wake of Donald Trump’s election victory, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has vowed to fight against Trump’s proposed policies to build a wall across the entire length of the U.S.-Mexico border, to reinstate a database for immigrants from majority-Muslim countries and to deport millions of undocumented immigrants. On Monday night, Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman sat down for an interview with Senator Sanders, who spoke about what it looks like to hold Trump and the Republican Party accountable.

  • Green Party presidential nominee Dr. Jill Stein has filed a lawsuit in efforts to force ballot recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. On Monday night at the Free Library in Philadelphia, Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman sat down with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders to speak about the recount effort.

  • Cuba has begun nine days of mourning following the death of revolutionary leader and former President Fidel Castro, who died Friday at the age of 90. In Havana, tens of thousands of people lined up to pay their respects to Castro, who launched the Cuban revolution to oust the U.S.-backed Cuban dictator, Fulgencio Batista, and went on to lead Cuba for nearly a half-century. On Monday night, Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman sat down with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders for an interview in front of a live audience at the Free Library of Philadelphia, where he spoke about the life and legacy of the revolutionary leader Fidel Castro.

  • In the wake of Donald Trump’s presidential election victory, many Sanders supporters now wonder if he would have been the stronger candidate to face Donald Trump in the general election than Hillary Clinton. Sanders is now working to rebuild the Democratic Party from inside and out. Earlier this month, he was elected to a leadership position in the Senate as the new chair of outreach for Senate Democrats. In addition, Sanders is leading the push for Congressmember Keith Ellison to become the next head of the Democratic National Committee. But would Sanders himself run in 2020? On Monday night, Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman sat down with Senator Sanders for his most extensive broadcast interview since the election at the Free Library of Philadelphia, where she asked him whether he might "feel the Bern" again in 2020.

  • Senator Bernie Sanders gave his first major address since the election on Wednesday night. Since challenging Clinton in the Democratic primary, he has emerged as one of the most powerful Democrats in Washington. On Wednesday, he was named to a leadership post in the Senate—chair of outreach—and was reappointed ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. During his speech, Sanders said he hopes to work with the president-elect on a number of issues, and called on Trump to rescind his decision to make Steve Bannon his chief strategist. Bannon is the former head of Breitbart News.

  • Larry Cohen, who served as a senior adviser to Bernie Sanders and is now the board chair of Our Revolution, says Donald Trump’s appointment of Breitbart News’ Steve Bannon as his chief strategist means he has "an enemy of the people, a divider of the nation" in a leading position in his administration.

  • We host a discussion on how Bernie Sanders and the Democratic Party plan to deal with a Trump presidency. We speak with RoseAnn DeMoro, executive director of National Nurses United; Larry Cohen, who served as a senior adviser to Bernie Sanders and is now the board chair of Our Revolution; and Kevin de León, president pro-tem of the California State Senate, who joins us in Marrakech, Morocco.

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